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Mup Options

Mup accepts a number of options. When invoking Mup from a command line, the options are specified by a dash followed by a letter. On Windows/MS-DOS systems, you can substitute a slash instead of the dash. If you are using Mupmate, you will use the "Set Options" form off of the "Run" menu to set the options. You just fill values into the form, and Mupmate will take care of the details of running Mup with your values, so you won't use the dash and letter shown below at all. Some of the options listed below are not available from Mupmate, either because they are meant for debugging, and thus not generally of interest to most users, or because Mupmate handles the appropriate details automatically. The options to the mup command (in alphabetical order) are:


Command line:  -c N
Mupmate:       Run > Set Options > Enable Auto Multirest and Min Measures to Combine
  
Combine consecutive measures of all rests or spaces into multirests (multiple measures of rest printed as a single measure, usually with the number of measures of rest printed above the staff). Any time there are N or more measures in a row that consist entirely of rests or spaces, they will be replaced by a multirest. The combining of measures stops when there is a visible staff that contains notes or lyrics, or that contain text or musical symbols after the first beat of the measure, or when there are parameter changes on a visible staff or in score context that change clef, key, or time signature, or when there is a bar line other than an ordinary bar. This option is most likely to be useful when printing a subset of staffs, where the particular staff(s) you are printing have long periods of rests. See information about the -s option and the "visible" parameter below. This option overrides the restcombine parameter.
Command line:  -C
Mupmate:       Option not available (only used for debugging).
  
This option is only used in connection with the -E option. It specifies that comments are to be passed through rather than deleted.
Command line:  -d N
Mupmate:       Option not available (only used for debugging).
  
Print debugging information. N is a bitmap, so you can turn on multiple debugging levels by adding up the flag values. For example, if you want to turn on both level 2 and level 4 tracing, N would be 6 (because 2+4=6).
1
input syntax/grammar analysis tracing
2
high level parse phase tracing
4
low level parse phase tracing
8
reserved
16
high level placement phase tracing
32
low level placement phase tracing
64
reserved
128
contents of the main internal list
256
high level print or MIDI phase tracing
512
low level print or MIDI phase tracing
N can be specified in decimal, octal (by using a leading zero), or hex (by using a leading 0x). This information is intended for debugging of Mup itself and thus is not likely to be of use to the average user, and is not available from Mupmate.
Command line:  -D MACRO[=macro-def]
Mupmate:       Run > Set Options > Macro Definitions
  
Define the macro MACRO. The macro name must consist of upper case letters, digits, and underscores, beginning with an upper case letter. The macro_def is optional, and gives the text of the macro. On UNIX, Linux, or similar systems, if it contains any white space or other special characters, it must be quoted. On other systems, white space may not be allowed. The -D option can be specified multiple times, if you wish to define more than one macro.
Command line:  -e errfile
Mupmate:       Option not needed. Mupmate automatically saves and displays error output.
  
Place the error message output into errfile instead of writing it to the standard error output stream.
Command line:  -E
Mupmate:       Option not needed (only used for debugging).
  
Rather than produce PostScript or MIDI output, just expand macros and includes, and write the result to the standard output stream. Comments in the input are deleted, unless the -C option is also specified.
Command line:  -f outfile
Mupmate:       Option not needed. Mupmate automatically creates appropriate output file.
  
Place the PostScript output into outfile instead of writing to the standard output.
Command line:  -F
Mupmate:       Run > Write PostScript File
  
This is like the -f option, except the name of the output file is derived from the name of the Mup input file. If the name of the Mup input file ends with a ".mup" suffix, the generated PostScript output file will end with a ".ps" suffix instead. If the name of the Mup input file ends with a ".MUP" suffix, the PostScript file will end with a ".PS" suffix. Otherwise, a ".ps" suffix will be appended to the end of the Mup input file name. If multiple input files are listed, the last is used. If none are specified (input is read from standard input), the name "stdin.ps" will be used for the output file.
Command line:  -l
Mupmate:       Help -> License
  
Show the Mup license and exit
Command line:  -m midifile
Mupmate:       Option not needed. Mupmate automatically creates appropriate output file.
  
Instead of generating PostScript output, generate standard MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) output, and put it in midifile. This option also causes the macro "MIDI" to become defined.
Command line:  -M
Mupmate:       Run > Write MIDI File
  
This is like the -m option, except the name of the MIDI file is derived from the name of the Mup input file. If the name of the Mup input file ends with a ".mup" suffix, the generated MIDI file will end with a ".mid" suffix instead. If the name of the Mup input file ends with a ".MUP" suffix, the MIDI file will end with a ".MID" suffix. Otherwise, a ".mid" suffix will be appended to the end of the Mup input file name. If multiple input files are listed, the last is used. If none are specified (input is read from standard input), the name "stdin.mid" will be used for the MIDI file.
Command line:  -o pagelist
Mupmate:       Run > Set Options > Pages to Display
  
Print only the pages given in pagelist. The pagelist can begin or end with optional qualifiers. A qualifier of "odd" will restrict printing to only odd numbered pages, while a qualifier of "even" will restrict to even numbered pages. A qualifier of "reversed" will cause pages to be printed in reverse order, which may be useful for printers that stack output in backwards order. A comma-separated list of pages and/or page number ranges can also be specified, where a range is two numbers separated by a dash. For example, -o1,7-9,12-14 would print pages 1, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, and 14. Adding a qualifier, -oodd,1,7-9,12-14 would print pages 1, 7, 9, and 13, while -o1,7-9,12-14,even,reversed would print pages 14, 12, and 8 in those orders. -oreversed would print all pages backwards, while -oreversed,odd would print all odd pages backwards. There is also a special page number of "blank" which will result in a completely blank page being output. This is most likely to be useful when the panelsperpage parameter. is set to 2. For example, to print a one page song on the right-hand panel rather than the left, you could use -oblank,1
Command line:  -p N,pageside
Mupmate:       Run > Set Options > First Page's Page Number
  
Start numbering pages at N instead of at 1. This can be set inside the Mup input file with the "firstpage" parameter, but the command line option will override the parameter. The page number can optionally be followed by a comma and either leftpage or rightpage, to specify whether any header, footer, top, or bottom on the first page should use the left or right page versions, if they are different. This would, of course, also control whether the left or right versions of header2, footer2, top2, and bottom2 are used on subsequent pages. If -o and -p are used together, the page numbers given in the -opagelist must be the printed page numbers. For example, if you use -p10 and want to print just the second page, you would need to specify -o11.
Command line:  -s stafflist
Mupmate:       Run > Set Options > Staffs to Display/Play
  
Only print the staffs that are included in stafflist. The stafflist can be a comma-separated list of staff numbers or ranges, such as "1,5" or "1-3,7-8" but no spaces are allowed in the list. If the -m or -M option is also used, to produce MIDI output, this option controls which staffs are played rather than which are printed. If you want only a single voice to be printed or played, you can follow a staff number or range with v1 or v2 or v3 to restrict to voice 1, 2 or 3 respectively, such as "1v2" or "1-4v1,5-6v2". Otherwise all voices on the staff are printed or played. You can't specify a list or range for voices; if you only want to make two out of three voices visible, you have to specify them separately, like "1v2,1v3". See also the "visible" parameter.
Command line:  -v
Mupmate:       Help > About Mupmate
  
Print the Mup version number. When invoked from command line, Mup will then exit. This document is for version 6.5.
Command line:  -xM,N
Mupmate:       Run > Set Options > Extract Measures
  
Extract measures M through N of the song. This allows you to print or play a part of a song. The comma and second value are optional; if not specified, the default is to go to the end of the piece. Positive values specify the number of measures from the beginning of the piece, while negative values are relative to the end, with -1 referring to the last measure of the song. So -x1,-1 means the entire song, if the song doesn't have a pickup measure. If the song has a pickup measure, that is specified by 0. So for a song with a pickup, -x0,-1 would mean the entire song, and -x0,0 would mean just the pickup measure. As other examples, -x-1,-1 means just the final measure of the song, -x2 means starting after the first full measure, -x3,4 means only measures 3 and 4, and -x6,6 means just measure 6. The starting measure is not allowed to be inside an ending. A common use for this option might be to generate a MIDI file for just a few measures. For example, if you were trying to tweak tempo values for a ritard in the last 2 measures of a song, you could use -x-2 to listen to just those measures.

When invoked from command line, the options, if any, can be followed by one or more files in the format described in this User's Guide. If no files are specified, standard input is read. If several files are listed, they are effectively concatenated together and treated as one big file. Since there are some things (such as header and footer) that are only allowed to occur once, if you have several independent pieces, Mup should be called on each individually rather than trying to print them all with one command. If a specified file does not exist, and its name does not already end with .mup or .MUP, then Mup will append .mup to the specified name and attempt to open that.

If you just want to create a PostScript output file, for printing on a PostScript printer, or viewing with a tool such as GSview, you can use the -f option, as in

    mup -f outfile.ps infile.mup

Or on Unix, Linux or MS-DOS command window, you could redirect the output into a file using the > character, as in:
    mup infile.mup > outfile.ps

For more debugging, in addition to the -d option, if the environment variable MUP_BB is set to "bcfgnsu" or any subset of those letters, the generated output will include "bounding boxes" for the things Mup internally calls bars (b), chords (c), feeds (f), grpsyls (g), header/footer and top/bottom (h), notes (n), staffs (s), and stuff (u). While this is intended for use in debugging Mup itself, it may also help you understand why Mup places things the way it does, since in general, Mup only allows bounding boxes to overlap according to specific rules. If viewed with a color PostScript viewer (not Mupdisp, which is covered below), these boxes will be in color.


* UNIX is a registered trademark of X/Open Company Limited
MS-DOS and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation
PostScript is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated


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